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Reviews for "Ancient French Aire for cello"

Ancient French Aire for cello
by Anchor
Recommends (23)
Mon, Jun 30, 2008 @ 8:49 PM
 
TheJoe
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permalink   Wed, Jul 2, 2008 @ 3:09 PM
It reminds me on whales, but there is also a memory of a documentation I have seen long time ago. It was a report about a landscape in south europe in summer time. Life seemed to be lamed for the heat in the mid day. A narrator just talked a few things about the land and people and this sort of cello playing made the whole sound.
This is inspiring and captivating!
How is the light metallic sound produced?
 
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permalink   Anchor Wed, Jul 2, 2008 @ 4:18 PM
I have 2 metal strings on the D and A and two gut strings on the C and G for this song…the metal strings give a brighter and naturally more metallic sound. Gut strings offer a deep resonance (but are harder to keep in tune). Ancient folksy tunes are often less structured and have a mood of languor, its true. Thanks Joe!
DoKashiteru
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permalink   Thu, Jul 3, 2008 @ 12:20 PM
Great sound on this sample! Nice job!
 
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permalink   Anchor Wed, Jul 9, 2008 @ 10:59 AM
thanks for taking tome to visit…..and listening.
essesq
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permalink   Tue, Jul 8, 2008 @ 11:19 PM
There is so much resonance in this piece. I think there is no more expressive instrument that humans play than the cello. I’m sure I’ll get a lot of hate mail from guitarist and keyboard players and others but for me the cello has it all over the competition for sheer emotion. I don’t know but I am assuming that it’s range most closely approximates the human voice.

Anyway, in our manufactured musical world it is really nice to hear a real instrument played by a real human. Thanks for posting this, I might just use it. :-)
 
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permalink   Anchor Wed, Jul 9, 2008 @ 10:58 AM
Thanks for the insightful comments. A cello is such a temperamental instrument - it needs all kinds of things - rosin - bow (which also has specific needs) - the right strings -
It has a loose parts (the unanchored bridge and detached pegs) and is affected by all kinds of weather as well as the style of its player -
some days its a welcoming companion you can pour your heart out to and others its a cold mistress who is irritated by every nuance, touch and gesture!
John Pazdan
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permalink   Mon, Feb 23, 2009 @ 6:19 AM
I love the sound of gut..C..no C..three harmonics cascading upwards to resonate against wood, lacquer and rosin.

This is a recording, not a construction..thank you.
 
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permalink   Anchor Tue, Feb 24, 2009 @ 5:05 AM
John
thanks - like most instruments, cello has evolved since its early Medieval ancestor…I tried to capture the mood and place of that early atmosphere with this offering. Your comments and visits are always appreciated.
simonlittlefield
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permalink   Mon, Feb 23, 2009 @ 12:38 PM
Very nice. I like it. Has the same immediate quality as the Pablo Casals recordings of the Bach cello suites.
 
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permalink   Anchor Tue, Feb 24, 2009 @ 5:09 AM
Simon-
Those Casals recordings of Bach are probably the ultimate cello offerings. Thanks for reference. And yes, I played the medieval variation without music, just closing my eyes and tuning into some remote ancestral memory….me the cello and an empty room with a mic. Thanks for this review! Cheers.