Songs of the Season-Pells, Samples, Remixes
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New Waiver Option: CC Zero

fourstones
admin
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permalink   Wed, Jun 3, 2009 @ 2:59 PM
Today we are turning on a new waiver for samples: CC0 (CC Zero).

For information about this waiver please see:

ABOUT CC0: http://creativecommons.org/...

CC0 FAQ: http://wiki.creativecommons...

This is somewhat an experiment to see how folks react but it’s something that Creative Commons (and well, me, personally) really believe in.

Waiving your rights to a sample with CC Zero is serious, and one-way, commitment so please be sure this is what you want to do before using the waiver.

(Note that CC0 is not a license, it’s a waiver.)
radiotimes
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permalink   Wed, Jun 3, 2009 @ 5:18 PM
If a remix is done using samples with a CCO waiver can the mixer change this to another CC licence when the new work is uploaded
 
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permalink   fourstones Wed, Jun 3, 2009 @ 5:23 PM
I’m trying to figure out the best way to do that. I was kind of waiting to see if that will really be a problem, or just a theoretical one. Open to suggestions.
 
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permalink   radiotimes Wed, Jun 3, 2009 @ 5:32 PM
I think for me the problem with the remix going into a “waiver” state is that my work then becomes available for commercial use for which I get no credit or cash!

What I like about CCM is that I knowingly give my work to others to use free of charge in the knowledge that they will pass this free usage down to the next user and so on.

To see the big old commercial world getting its hands on it without any acknowledgement goes against the principle of CCM for me.

If their was the option for the mixer to change the waiver to a licence thats OK but then that leaves the sampler unhappy and maybe the next user will change his remix to a CCO waiver!

Tricky one!!
 
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permalink   fourstones Wed, Jun 3, 2009 @ 5:40 PM
I was asking for suggestions regarding the user interface - one that doesn’t confuse/make things worse.

The other stuff is about the philosophy behind CC0 which is different than that of trying to protect your work from the world. It’s a gift to the world. When you give a gift to someone do you expect to get paid? with either money or credit? (rhetorical) Once you’ve made the choice to use the waiver there shouldn’t be a whole lot of hand-wringing after that.
 
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permalink   radiotimes Wed, Jun 3, 2009 @ 5:53 PM
As you say, when I give a gift to someone I don’t expect them to pay me but nor do I expect them to go and sell it!!
 
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permalink   fourstones Wed, Jun 3, 2009 @ 5:58 PM
you’re still coming at it from a place of wanting to control. perhaps cc0 isn’t for you - that’s cool.
 
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permalink   radiotimes Wed, Jun 3, 2009 @ 6:09 PM
You’re right CCO does not appear to be for me.

Going back to my original question it just seems to me that if the sample originator gives the CCO waiver which will automatically give my remix the same then I will have to just not use those samples.

I like the idea that someone can if they wish give their product to the world to do with as it wishes its just I’d like to have the same freedom to give the new remix the licence I would like to have on it when I have used it for my purposes.

Anyway enough from me let’s see what others think.
 
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permalink   zotz Tue, Jun 30, 2009 @ 6:21 AM
Quote: fourstonesI’m trying to figure out the best way to do that. I was kind of waiting to see if that will really be a problem, or just a theoretical one. Open to suggestions.

I suggest technically to treat incorporating a cc0 bit the same as incorporating a BY bit. Sure, attribution is not required but neither is it forbidden and it is polite.

Does that make sense?

all the best,

drew
 
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permalink   colab Wed, Jun 3, 2009 @ 6:30 PM
Quote: radiotimesIf a remix is done using samples with a CCO waiver can the mixer change this to another CC licence when the new work is uploaded
This is actually the same thing I asked over here - to me it’s the same issue as how “BY” licenses are treated. The workaround should be the same for both cases, and should be no different just because a person gave up all their rights to their contribution.
 
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permalink   fourstones Wed, Jun 3, 2009 @ 7:38 PM
yup - and it really is just a matter of presenting it in a way that doesn’t raise more questions than it answers. One of the challenges of being the first site to really take these new fangled licenses/waivers head on is finding the balance between what they imply/require legally and making the usable - this is: not overwhelm the musician with legal jargon and philosophy.
 
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permalink   zotz Tue, Jun 30, 2009 @ 6:23 AM
Quote: radiotimesIf a remix is done using samples with a CCO waiver can the mixer change this to another CC licence when the new work is uploaded

Legally, it is not required to go there any more than a remix is done using samples with a BY license needs to stay plain BY licensed.

Does that make sense to you?

all the best,

drew
spinmeister
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permalink   Wed, Jun 3, 2009 @ 6:35 PM
CC0 is truly making something a gift with no strings attached. Why would anyone want to do that? Why do people do nice things for strangers? Why do people help others with free advice in Internet forums? Why do people write free software?

Most free music software that I know doesn’t require credit to be given to the author of the software in works created with that software. That software really is a gift to the user. The software even allows the creation of commercial works. Truly no strings attached — a true gift.

The software that runs ccMixter (called ccHost) doesn’t require giving credit to the CC or to VS, if someone decides to install it on their server to create a media serving/hosting website (even if that site is commercial).

So the argument might be made, that music makers who use all (or some) free software now have a way to say thanks for that free gift of software by putting some free music out there. Or not. Your choice. If you don’t feel like doing that for any reason at all, just don’t. No need to justify your position - just don’t do it.

I personally like the idea of a world, where a portion (not all) of good stuff is gifted. I also think it’s pretty cool when people who have received gifts are making gifts to someone else as their “response”.
 
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permalink   fourstones Wed, Jun 3, 2009 @ 7:40 PM
Quote: spinmeisterNo need to justify your position

exactly. I like that.
 
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permalink   spinmeister Wed, Jun 3, 2009 @ 9:24 PM
in response to a private email exchange, allow me to clarify: I believe all different ways of transferring IP (Intellectual Property) are totally OK and in an ideal world, they do live side by side in parallel. Personally I am participating/have participated in at least three rather different economic models of IP transfer. Sometimes I charge money for my work, sometimes I flat out give it away, and sometimes I have worked for contingency arrangements (i.e. I get something out of it, only if my customer makes money).

And I most certainly have been on the receiving side of all 3 economic models. I have benefited from entirely free stuff, I’ve paid good money for some stuff and I have made success based arrangements.

I decide on a case by case basis. Not always consistent, but always having feet in both camps commercial and free. For me, they are NOT enemies of each other, but both belong to a healthy and happy human experience. But that’s just me. I don’t lose respect for anyone taking a different personal path.

I do however have limited respect for those who argue strongly for inherent eternal superiority of one vs. the other. Life is complex. It’s black AND white. It’s day AND night. It’s free AND commercial.

Most of my music software and sample libraries are commercial (as in not pirated, properly licensed and paid for with my own money) (side note: putting some limitations on exactly what I can turn around and release for free as individual tracks), but I also use a couple of freebies. I’m also getting to play at ccM for free. Don’t even have to watch flash ads or even text adds. Color me grateful.

/end rant and off to upload some CC0.