Break the Silence Event-extended!
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Reviews for "4 Blurry Photographs"

4 Blurry Photographs
by jaspertine
Recommends (9)
Sat, Jun 28, 2008 @ 7:10 PM
 
Doghouse Riley
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permalink   Sat, Jun 28, 2008 @ 8:34 PM
Yep, that’s the same dream I had after the mexican food and the ice cream. Have you got ESP or somethin?
vo1k1
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permalink   Sat, Jun 28, 2008 @ 9:05 PM
This is an interesting experiment. I happened to read the description before listening. So, I kinda got that this was a process piece. It would have been equally interesting raw (though not informed). Are you a Steve Reich fan? I’m also really curious if you setup the audio process prior to the “automatic” selection of the input. Inspiring in it’s approach.
 
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permalink   jaspertine Sun, Jun 29, 2008 @ 12:06 PM
I had thought out much of the process ahead of time, though a lot of the specific details were in the moment, and the idea to link each bit with a photo was very last minute.

thanks
slumberlords
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permalink   Sun, Jun 29, 2008 @ 2:22 AM
this song sounds like how i feel the morning after a dodgy kebab. Still, I like it though.. its cool
radiotimes
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permalink   Sun, Jun 29, 2008 @ 4:40 AM
I am a great believer in taking music beyond its normal boundaries but please this really is just a waste of time and serves no purpose.
oldDog
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permalink   Sun, Jun 29, 2008 @ 8:51 AM
I really like this, particularly with the photos (that second one is great).
I often wonder why these kind of block contrasts aren’t used more in music, it’s much more common in the visual arts. Each chunk sounds different because of where it comes in the sequence.
 
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permalink   vo1k1 Sun, Jun 29, 2008 @ 12:36 PM
Quote: oldDogI often wonder why these kind of block contrasts aren’t used more in music, it’s much more common in the visual arts. Each chunk sounds different because of where it comes in the sequence.

In general, I am in strong agreement with you on this! For the sake of argument, there is obvious use of tonality, rhythm, and instrumentation for contrast in much music. But yes, these stark changes as a compositional device feel very effective, in an almost cinematic manner (Full Metal Jacket comes to mind)!
Clarance Boddyker
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permalink   Wed, Jul 2, 2008 @ 3:00 AM
Listening to this track makes one wonder how your skills as a sonic experimentalist (Is that a word? Hmm?) would be applied to fleshing out whole and complete tracks. This is the first track of yours I have heard, so I am going to check out a coupla of your other tracks.

There are no transitions, so for me this was a very jarring experience, taking in the sounds just for it to end and then the new sounds come in.

I wondered what each sound segment would sound like if they were each expanded on and fleshed out and more structured. I found myself wondering how am I supposed to listen to this track, how to take it in, instead of really taking it in.

I commend your sense of experimenting with sound convention, but this track almost feels like a sampler of your broader production senses and skills.
 
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permalink   jaspertine Wed, Jul 2, 2008 @ 5:14 PM
Thanks for the reply, in some ways, this was precisely the reaction I was aiming for, because I wanted the piece to really demand that you think about what you’re hearing, and how to make sense of it. There’s never a right or wrong way to react to a piece of music.

The first time I’d heard silence used as a transition was in a track called “3 locked grooves” by a group called Disk, and it is quite jarring, especially since we’re not used to hearing it.

Incidentally, I had recorded a full album of experimental stuff about a year ago, you can listen/download it here.
These tracks are hardly structured, but they do at least have a beginning, middle and end.