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Death as a Bride

 
uploaded: Sat, Oct 28, 2017 @ 12:44 PM last modified: Sat, Oct 28, 2017 @ 12:44 PM  (add)
bySnowflake
FeaturingShakespeare
length3:26
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This spoken word is a compilation of lines from various writings by Shakespeare. I took phrases from Hamlet, Julius Caesar, Measure for Measure, Richard II, Henry IV, Henry the VI, and The Tempest, making efforts to arrange them to fit our Ghost Notes Halloween event. I only added a few words here and there —the rest is Mr. Shakespeare.

Since I was a young girl I’ve been strangely fascinated with death. Not in a fearful or gruesome way, but rather, with a bit of wonder as to why our culture doesn’t want to really talk about this common end we all share.

“All that lives must die, passing through nature to eternity.” ~Hamlet

I’m currently recording in the dining room instead of my makeshift vocal booth in the closet, and we’re close to the street in busy Los Angeles. So I had to trim each phrase to avoid helicopters and cars, giving the vocal a gated affect. I hope it works!

Happy Halloween!

Death as a Bride
by Snowflake & Shakespeare

All that lives must die
That we shall die we know; ‘tis but the time
If I must die
I will encounter darkness as a bride,
And hug it tightly in these mortal arms of mine.

Woe, destruction, ruin, and decay;
The worst is death, and death will have his day.
Come, let us take a muster speedily:
Doomsday is near; die all, die merrily.

Go thou, and another room in hell shall you fill.
Let’s choose executors and talk of wills:
For what on earth can we bequeath,
Save our desposed bodies in the ground beneath.

All that lives must die
That we shall die we know; ‘tis but the time
If I must die
I will encounter darkness as a bride,
And hug it tightly in these mortal arms of mine.

Why, what is pomp, rule, reign, but earth and dust?
And, live we how we can, yet die we must.
He that dies pays all debts.
With nothing left breathing - not triumph nor regret.

Darest thou die?
The sense of death is most in apprehension;
And the poor beetle that we tread upon,
In corporal sufferance feels a pang as great
As you or I in our mortal descension.

All that lives must die
That we shall die we know; ‘tis but the time
If I must die
I will encounter darkness as a bride,
And hug it tightly in these mortal arms of mine.

Ay, but to die, and go we know not where;
To lie in cold obstruction; slain by an ending inevitably fair.
Mount, mount, my soul! thy seat is up on high;
Whilst my gross flesh sinks downward, here to die.

Cowards die many times before their deaths;
The valiant never taste of death but once.
For in that sleep what dreams may come,
This must give us pause to endure all now with patience.

All that lives must die
That we shall die we know; ‘tis but the time
If I must die
I will encounter darkness as a bride,
And hug it tightly in these mortal arms of mine.

If I must die
I will embrace darkness as a bride,
And hug her tightly in these mortal arms of mine.




 

"Death as a Bride"
by Snowflake

2017 - Licensed under
Creative Commons
Attribution (3.0)



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