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Best Linux Remix Apps

Bruce H. McCosar
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permalink   Wed, Feb 6, 2008 @ 7:15 PM
Here’s hoping.

I run Ubuntu Linux, not Windows.

I am getting started with the concept of remixing and creating new material based on widely divergent source samples.

Problem is, I see no point in reinventing the wheel. If there’s anyone out there that can point me to the tools that seem to work the best, I’d appreciate it.

Here’s what I use right now:

- Hardware for recording, not software.

- Audacity for mixing and rendering pure audio.

- Rosegarden for MIDI and synth work.

- Ridiculous numbers of softsynths, including a pipe organ simulator called Aeolus and a classic synth emulator named Bristol.

- Hydrogen (drum machine)

- Lilypond (notation and MIDI output)

I’m in the process of learning several sound environment type languages, including Chuck and WCNT.

That said, I know there are several apps I’ve messed around with but not explored fully yet, including SooperLooper, Qtracker, and various MOD tracker type gizmos.

With so many ways open, how to I choose where to start? Ah, I ask people who’ve made the journey and see what worked for them. And that’s how we came here. So thanks in advance if you can point me out a good section of road to start on :D
celionati
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permalink   Wed, Feb 6, 2008 @ 7:32 PM
Quote: Bruce H. McCosarHere’s hoping.

I run Ubuntu Linux, not Windows.

I am getting started with the concept of remixing and creating new material based on widely divergent source samples.

Problem is, I see no point in reinventing the wheel. If there’s anyone out there that can point me to the tools that seem to work the best, I’d appreciate it.

Check out Ubuntu Studio http://ubuntustudio.org/ for a collection of good software. I added Ubuntu Studio to a pre-existing Ubuntu installation, by adding the Studio repository in Synaptic. I think that’s better than installing Ubuntu Studio from scratch.

Quote: Bruce H. McCosarHere’s what I use right now:

- Hardware for recording, not software.

I think you’re on the right track. For recording, the limiting factor seems to be the ease of pushing the buttons. I tried recording on a Macintosh Powerbook laptop, using GarageBand, and the button pushing distracted me from the performance. I now use an Edirol R09. What hardware do you use?

Quote: Bruce H. McCosar- Audacity for mixing and rendering pure audio.
I’ve been using Audacity, and as far as I know there’s nothing better under Linux.


Quote: Bruce H. McCosar- Hydrogen (drum machine)
Haven’t done drum stuff myself, but my son uses Hydrogen, and I think it’s your best choice.

Quote: Bruce H. McCosar- Lilypond (notation and MIDI output)
I’ve been using LilyPond to produce scores, and I’m pretty sure it’s the best thing available. Haven’t used it to produce MIDI.

So, I suggest that you install Ubuntu Studio, with at least the Audio applications (they have graphics and video in separate sections). Try out a bunch of them. I think you’re on basically the right track.

Mike O’D.

http://people.cs.uchicago.e...
 
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permalink   Bruce H. McCosar Wed, Feb 6, 2008 @ 8:21 PM
Quote: celionati
..What hardware do you use?


The main hard disk recorder I have is a Korg D888. The rest of the setup — well, I assembled it piece by piece, and I call it “Apollo 13”. (If you saw the movie, there was this particular power up sequence they had to use to get the command module working properly — a few of the components are the proof that you should never power up something upstream of a live input jack.) I input bass with a direct box or a Nady preamp, go through a dbx compressor, and every now and then hit an effect, though Audacity sort of wiped out the need for most effects with its range of plugins.

(There’s a photo of the general area on one of my Dandelife pages.)

For MIDI, I have to concur on Edirol — my UM-3EX worked fine with Linux right out of the box, and absolutely rules with JACK applications.

Actually I already hit Ubuntu Studio, which is how I came to have so many packages installed and only a trace of familiarity with the more specialized ones. I have heard about using looping software, but being hard headed, usually prefer to play and play and play instead of record a loop :D However, when I downloaded a few samples earlier, I immediately saw how looping them automagically would make my life a bit easier.

Thanks for your help so far! Nice to know I don’t have too far to go to catch up with basics.
Bruce H. McCosar
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permalink   Fri, Feb 8, 2008 @ 2:35 PM
Another ccMixter member contacted me via email and passed on a link that really paid off —

Renoise is now available for Linux.

Now, there are other, similar applications, but here’s what won me over:

I’ve been running Linux for some time now. I’m well acquainted with learning about an application by reading manuals, API documentation, man pages, etc.

However, Renoise actually has an introductory video tutorial. (The same sort of thing that got me interested in tapestrea).

It cut that “learning curve” in half, and really pulled me in. Turns out this is exactly the sort of tool I was looking for. Put another way, shifting blocks of audio around manually in Audacity isn’t the best way to spend an afternoon ;-)

So thanks again for that tip!

I’d still like to hear from others. I figure with the weekend coming up, more folks will have time to chime in.
 
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permalink   My Free Mickey Fri, Dec 30, 2011 @ 11:12 PM
Renoise is a bomb. True there is a learning curve but once you get familiar with it, it becomes a pleasure to work with. And it’s come at a fair price for high…

What looks good to I think is ardour. Just started yesterday with a try; I looks promising
 
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permalink   My Free Mickey Fri, Dec 30, 2011 @ 11:12 PM
Renoise is a bomb. True there is a learning curve but once you get familiar with it, it becomes a pleasure to work with. And it’s come at a fair price for high…

What looks good to I think is ardour. Just started yesterday with a try; I looks promising
 
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permalink   pt_music Tue, Jan 3, 2012 @ 4:30 AM
Quote: Bruce H. McCosar
… Renoise…


thank you for the name of this program, i’ve been searching since 1998. always i have the look of the paddernmanager in my mind but it doesnt have a name.
now you have solved the problem XD .

i’ve bought it today.
DJ_Saku
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permalink   Thu, Jul 17, 2008 @ 12:24 PM
i have two videos of two separate presentations i have done at my LUG meeting. the first is a 30-or-so minute performance where i demonstrated TerminatorX and how it can be used for live DJing. the second video is a brief introduction to audio creation.

both of them, i use ubuntu studio (gutsy for the first, hardy for the second). unfortunately, the second video cuts short, but at the end, i just created two drum beats with hydrogen and mixed them in terminatorx.

http://video.google.com/vid...
http://video.google.com/vid...